I D
× COMMENTARYCOVER STORYIN THE NEWSNEWSFRONTSCHEMENTATOR + Show More BUSINESS NEWSTECHNICAL & PRACTICALFEATURE REPORTFACTS AT YOUR FINGERTIPSTECHNOLOGY PROFILEEQUIPMENT & SERVICESFOCUSNEW PRODUCTS + Show More SHOW PREVIEWS

Comment uncategorized

Piloting a process that makes hydrogen and carbon from methane

By Gerald Ondrey |

Next year, construction will begin on an industrial-scale pilot plant to further develop a new process that decomposes methane into H2 and carbon. The process uses a thermo-catalytic decomposition (TCD) technology developed by Hycamite TCD Technologies Oy (Kokkola, Finland; www.hycamite.com). The pilot plant will be located in the Kokkola Industrial Park (KIP), which has the highest concentration of inorganic chemical industry in Northern Europe. In the TCD process (diagram), natural gas or biogas is continuously fed to a fixed-bed or fluidized bed (or both) reactor operating at 500–800°C and 1 atm. In the reactor, CH4 is split into H2 and C using a proprietary catalyst that the company has developed over several years. H2 is purified (>95%) by pressure-swing absorption (PSA), and the unreacted CH4 is circulated back to the reactor. Solid carbon is discharged from the reactor, cooled and packaged. The technology can generate several different high-quality allotropes of carbon, and can be optimized for preferred allotropes. Because the reactor is heated by hydrogen and renewable electricity, with heat recovery, there are zero CO2 emissions generated in the process. According to CEO Laura Rahikka, TCD hydrogen technology has…
Related Content

Chemical Engineering publishes FREE eletters that bring our original content to our readers in an easily accessible email format about once a week.
Subscribe Now
Steel Belt Units for Medical Membranes
Upstream Oil & Gas: Automation intelligence from wellhead to distribution
Video - CoriolisMaster
Video - Do you really need a thermowell?
The influence of IIoT in the dewatering process step of pigment production

View More